Students

Error message

  • Deprecated function: The each() function is deprecated. This message will be suppressed on further calls in _menu_load_objects() (line 579 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/menu.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Notice: Trying to access array offset on value of type int in element_children() (line 6600 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).
  • Deprecated function: implode(): Passing glue string after array is deprecated. Swap the parameters in drupal_get_feeds() (line 394 of /var/www/drupal-7.x/includes/common.inc).

As News Deserts Expand, Student Journalists Step Up

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Fri, 22/03/2024 - 7:00pm in

On the drizzly first Tuesday in March, voters crammed into a historic white clapboard meeting house on a hill in Stockbridge, Vermont. It was Town Meeting Day, when Vermonters across the state gather to debate and vote on local government. And the election for the next member of Stockbridge’s three-person select board, the main governing body of this town of just over 700 people, had drawn record turnout.

As voters waited to cast handwritten ballots in a long queue that snaked around wooden benches, University of Vermont sophomore Sarah Andrews approached locals, notebook in hand. Andrews and two classmates were not just there for course work: They were there as part of UVM’s Community News Service, reporting for the White River Valley Herald, the weekly newspaper that covers 16 towns in this rural region.

Small newspapers like the Herald have long been the main way of recording and distributing information about community happenings. But local news outlets are disappearing. The 2023 State of Local News report found that about half of all counties across the country have only one local news outlet, and more than 200 counties have none.

UVM student reporters covered an unusually busy Town Meeting Day in the small town of Stockbridge.UVM student reporters covered an unusually busy Town Meeting Day in the small town of Stockbridge. Credit: Elizabeth Hewitt

As local news deserts grow, universities are stepping in. With initiatives ranging from student-staffed statehouse bureaus to newspapers run by journalism schools, these academic-media partnerships are bolstering local news.

“It’s a short-term win and it’s a long-term win,” says Penny Muse Abernathy, a visiting professor at Northwestern University’s Medill School of Journalism, and co-author of the local news report. 

University-media partnerships provide reliable local news coverage in communities where it is needed. In the process, students get hands-on experience with community decision-making in a way that shapes their careers and worldviews going forward.

Credit: Elizabeth Hewitt

Sarah Andrews and two of her classmates covered Town Meeting Day for the White River Valley Herald, the weekly newspaper that covers 16 communities in Vermont’s rural Upper Valley region.

 

“Too often over the last 20 years, we’ve tended to focus on teaching students what we assume are professional digital skills for the digital age, when in fact journalism at its core teaches not only the journalist but the citizen how to employ critical thinking and make wise decisions,” says Abernathy.

Closures of smaller news outlets over the last several decades have left many regions without reliable media coverage. Since 2005, the number of newspapers in the US has dropped by a third, and the number of journalists has declined by 60 percent. The erosion of local news makes it harder for community members to be aware of the issues in their regions.

“Most of the decisions that affect our immediate everyday life occur at the local level,” says Abernathy.

 Through university-led journalism programs, students — under the tutelage and editorial supervision of faculty members — are stepping in to fill in some of those gaps. The model isn’t new: The University of Missouri has been practicing a “teaching hospital” approach that involves students in community news coverage since 1908. Now, in the current media landscape, higher education institutions are looking at how they can both offer students enriching experiences and contribute to communities, according to Richard Watts, who heads the University of Vermont’s Center for Community News.

Crushed by negative news?

Sign up for the Reasons to be Cheerful newsletter.
[contact-form-7]

“Students like to do things that are real,” he says. “There’s a sense of agency about writing real stories that real people read and make a real difference.”

There are about 120 such programs at colleges and universities across the country, according to Watts. The Center for Community News found in 2023 that over the last year, more than 2,000 student journalists across the US had produced more than 10,000 news stories that were published in community outlets. The stories were estimated to reach more than 14 million people.

Often offered to students in the forms of classes, the programs require a high level of commitment from faculty members — editing stories for publication is more intensive than typical grading. Across different regions, the scope and focus of programs varies, says Watts.

Louisiana State University’s Manship School of Mass Communication has taken advantage of its location a few miles away from the State Capitol to bolster coverage of the legislature.

 News coverage of state policy-making is among the casualties of the erosion of local news. Across the country, the number of reporters covering statehouses full-time declined by 34 percent between 2014 and 2022.

Claire Sullivan portrait in front of a building.Claire Sullivan has been an LSU Manship School Statehouse reporter for both the 2023 and the 2024 sessions. Credit: Ria Salway

As press coverage of the Louisiana legislature diminished, LSU launched a statehouse bureau in 2016. Through a high-level journalism class, student reporters cover committee meetings and floor proceedings. Grant funding allows the program to keep students on as interns to cover the weeks of the legislative session after the semester ends. Christopher Drew, a former New York Times investigative reporter and editor who heads the bureau program, edits the stories. Then they’re made available for any news outlet to publish for free. 

 Ninety-five outlets have run LSU student statehouse stories, ranging from some of the state’s largest newspapers to small weekly and bi-weekly papers, many of which Drew says wouldn’t have another option to get stories about news from the statehouse.“Our students never have any problem getting taken seriously by lawmakers because we often are the hometown reporter for the lawmakers,” says Drew. “A lot of them come from places [where] the only thing that constituents could read about what they do comes from what the LSU students do.”

The idea is spreading; 20 states have some form of university-led statehouse bureau, and Drew is involved in conversations with schools interested in launching programs in additional states. LSU also offers an investigative journalism course, focused on civil rights era cold cases, which similarly distributes stories to outlets. Drew is working on a new project that would create a network of universities and colleges around Louisiana, partnering journalism programs with small local news outlets.

LSU senior Claire Sullivan is taking the statehouse course for the second time this spring. She sees the community news model as mutually beneficial for students like herself who want experience and local news outlets that want coverage.

“It’s the best kind of motivator,” says Sullivan. “You want to do your best job for the local outlets.”

Devon Sanders, an LSU Manship School Statehouse reporter, interviewed State Representative Katrina Jackson in 2018.Devon Sanders, an LSU Manship School Statehouse reporter, interviewed State Representative Katrina Jackson in 2018. Credit: Katherine Seghers / LSU

The Oglethorpe Echo has been covering the issues of Oglethorpe County in northeastern Georgia since 1874. The weekly was poised to shut down in 2021, when the long-time publisher was ready to retire. Instead, a community member hatched a plan for the local paper to be taken over by the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication.

Over the last two and a half years, students have reported the stories that fill the Echo’s pages. During fall and spring semesters, the newspaper is staffed by students in a senior capstone class. Over summer and winter breaks, students are hired as interns, so there’s no break in news coverage. The paper was converted to a nonprofit, and Andy Johnston, a longtime sports journalist who had been an adjunct professor, came on as the paper’s editor. 

Student journalists have dug into issues related to limited rural broadband access, and use of a particular form of fertilizer on local farms. In its first full year of operating under the university, the paper won nine awards from the Georgia Press Association.

Courtesy of Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication

The Oglethorpe Echo nearly shut down in 2021. Instead, the University of Georgia’s Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication took over the paper. Now, student stories fill its pages.

One difference between university-led media and traditional local outlets is that student reporters turn over frequently, so they don’t have the long-term knowledge and relationships that a professional reporter would. But editors — both employed by universities and with community news outlets — help provide that expertise. In Vermont, when the White River Valley Herald picks up stories written by UVM students, editor Tim Calabro says he occasionally adds in local context that students don’t know. 

When the University of Georgia took over the Echo, Johnston says there was an adjustment period of building trust with the community. The university is located about 25 miles west of Oglethorpe County, so students don’t live locally. But the feedback he gets is generally positive. Readers appreciate having a local news source, and they particularly like slice-of-life stories that feature their friends and family members.

“We’re writing to tell the stories of the community, tell the stories of the county,” he says.

Current Echo students Michael Johnson (left) and Izzy Wagner read through a copy of The Oglethorpe Echo.Current Echo students Michael Johnson (left) and Izzy Wagner read through a copy of The Oglethorpe Echo. Courtesy of Grady College of Journalism and Mass Communication

Back in Vermont, on Town Meeting Day, a total of 139 people voted in the election for Stockbridge’s new select board member. Two days later, Andrews’ story about the election ran in the White River Valley Herald. 

For the Herald’s editor, Tim Calabro, UVM students’ stories helped his limited staff cover news around the region on the biggest single day for local government of the year. But Calabro says there are broader benefits of the program beyond filling the paper with news. 

“Of all the dangers that newspapers, news organizations of any stripe are facing, the biggest worry is that people just won’t care about what’s going on in their communities,” Calabro says.

Not every student who goes through a university-led news program will go on to a career in journalism, he says. But even for those without ambitions in journalism, he sees this kind of program as valuable for engaging young people in communities: “Being a human being in society,” as Calabro puts it, “it’s good to care about society.”

The post As News Deserts Expand, Student Journalists Step Up appeared first on Reasons to be Cheerful.

Students occupy Bristol uni building in protest at ‘profits from genocide’

Students demand divestment and an end to academic ties

Bristol University students have taken control of one of the university’s Wills Memorial Building in a protest to demand an end to its ‘complicity with arms companies’ and to call for a series of actions on its part to ‘support Palestine and Palestinians’:

The demanded actions include:

  • an end to cooperation with weapons manufacturers
  • protection for Palestinian students and special consideration for those taking exams who have been affected by Israel’s slaughter in Gaza
  • protection for anti-Zionist beliefs among staff and students – an issue on which Bristol university has a shameful record and has been the scene of intense pressure campaigns by pro-Israel groups claiming that anti-Zionism, opposition to the settler-colonial state that has displaced Palestinians and treats them as inferior
  • recognition of the existence of Palestine – an existence denied by hardcore supporters of Israel
  • scholarships for Palestinian refugees

Israel has killed over forty thousand Palestinian civilians, more than two thirds of them women and children, and injured twice as many, in its genocidal assault on Gaza and has ignored orders from the International Court of Justice to cease its slaughter and allow food, fuel and medicines into Gaza immediately. Gaza is now in famine, with experts predicting that more will die in the coming months from hunger and disease than from Israel’s bombs, missiles and bullets, with children again worst affected.


Palestinian flags can be seen through the Wills building’s doors. The figures in the second image have been blurred to protect identities.

The group is also demanding an end to the use of a ‘check-in’ system that tracks the location of students.

Wednesday’s action is not the first by Bristol students demanding justice for Palestinians and an end to discrimination against them and their supporters. Four months ago, students protested in the university’s ‘profits from genocide’:

And earlier this month, a group occupied Bristol University’s Victoria Rooms in a pro-Gaza protest.

The British government has mounted a pressure campaign against universities, threatening to defund them if they allow ‘extremism’ or ‘antisemitism’ in the form of pro-Palestinian speech and activism. Shamefully, a number of universities have capitulated to pressure from the UK state and from pro-Israel groups claiming that speech against Israel’s crimes and occupation of Palestinian land infringe on their rights and constitutes ‘hate’ toward Jews, even though many UK Jews oppose Israel’s actions and oppression of Palestinians.

Last month, former Bristol professor David Miller won a landmark employment tribunal case against the university, which had sacked him after pressure from pro-Israel groups, despite lawyers it appointed to run two investigations finding that he had said nothing antisemitic. The win set a precedent that anti-Zionist political beliefs are a protected characteristic under equalities law and cannot be used as grounds for dismissal. Skwawkbox understands that Prof Miller is not involved in the students’ protest.

Solidarity with students in Bristol and elsewhere who are demanding an end to complicity in war crimes.

If you wish to republish this post for non-commercial use, you are welcome to do so – see here for more.

Are Your Students Doing The Reading?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sat, 17/02/2024 - 1:04am in

And if they’re not, what can be done to get them to do it? Or is that the wrong way to think about it?

[Note: This was originally posted on February 16, 2024, 9:04am, but was lost when a problem on February 17th, 2024 required the site to be reset. I’m reposting it on February 18th with its original publication date, but I’m sorry to report that the comments, many of which contained helpful suggestions, may have been lost; I’m looking into the matter.]

These questions come up in response to a recent piece by Adam Kotsko (North Central College) at Slate. He writes about the “diffuse confluence of forces that are depriving students of the skills needed to meaningfully engage” with books:

As a college educator, I am confronted daily with the results of that conspiracy-without-conspirators. I have been teaching in small liberal arts colleges for over 15 years now, and in the past five years, it’s as though someone flipped a switch. For most of my career, I assigned around 30 pages of reading per class meeting as a baseline expectation—sometimes scaling up for purely expository readings or pulling back for more difficult texts. (No human being can read 30 pages of Hegel in one sitting, for example.) Now students are intimidated by anything over 10 pages and seem to walk away from readings of as little as 20 pages with no real understanding. Even smart and motivated students struggle to do more with written texts than extract decontextualized take-aways. Considerable class time is taken up simply establishing what happened in a story or the basic steps of an argument—skills I used to be able to take for granted.

Kotsko anticipates one kind of reaction to this complaint:

Hasn’t every generation felt that the younger cohort is going to hell in a handbasket? Haven’t professors always complained that educators at earlier levels are not adequately equipping their students? And haven’t students from time immemorial skipped the readings?

He reassures himself with the thought that other academics agree with him and that he is “not simply indulging in intergenerational grousing.” That’s not a good response, because the intergenerational divide is not as relevant as the divide between academics and non-academics (i.e., nearly all of their students): professors were not, and are not, normal.

Still, I’m a professor, too, and despite my anti-declinist sentiments and worries about my own cognitive biases, I can’t help but agree that students do not seem as able or willing to actually do the reading, and as able or willing to put in the work to try to understand it, as they have in the past (though I probably don’t think the decline is as steep as Kotsko thinks it is).

Kotsko identifies smartphones and pandemic lockdowns as among the culprits responsible for poor student reading, but acknowledges we “can’t go back in time” and undo their effects. Nor does he offer any solutions in this article.

Are there any solutions? What can we do? What should we do? What do you do?

Related:
How Do You Teach Your Students to Read
The Point and Selection of Readings in Introductory Philosophy Courses
Why Students Aren’t Reading

 

The post Are Your Students Doing The Reading? first appeared on Daily Nous.

Student Groups Are Distributing Free Emergency Contraceptives on Campus

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Tue, 12/12/2023 - 7:00pm in

This story was originally published by KFF Health News.

Limya Harvey and Cydney Mumford set up a folding table a few times a month on the University of Texas-San Antonio (UTSA) campus to give away kits containing emergency contraceptives, condoms and lube, or menstrual products like tampons and pads. They typically bring 50 of each type of kit, and after just an hour or two everything is gone.

The 19-year-old sophomores — Harvey is enrolled at UTSA and Mumford at Northeast Lakeview College — founded the organization Black Book Sex Ed last spring. Their mission is to educate students and others in need about sexual health and connect them with free services and products packaged into kits they distribute on campus, in the community and through their website.

“Both of us grew up rather lower-income,” Mumford said, “so there’s a soft spot as it relates to people who say, ‘Oh, I just don’t have it right now.’ That’s part of the reason we started doing this.”

Harvey and Mumford aren’t alone. A growing number of students on college campuses nationwide are stepping in to provide other students with free or low-cost emergency contraceptives, birth control and menstrual products.

Crushed by negative news?

Sign up for the Reasons to be Cheerful newsletter.
[contact-form-7]

They are also pushing back against threats to their reproductive freedom since the US Supreme Court’s Dobbs decision last year, which eliminated federal abortion protections.

Although emergency contraceptives are legal in every state, some policymakers worry that in states that ban or severely restrict abortion, access to emergency contraceptives and other types of birth control may erode because of people failing to distinguish between drugs that prevent pregnancy and medications used for abortions.

“Our requests for help have quadrupled since Dobbs,” said Kelly Cleland, the executive director of the American Society for Emergency Contraception, which provides toolkits and technical assistance to help students develop what are becoming known as peer-to-peer distribution networks. Those student networks provide emergency contraceptives and bring vending machines to their campuses that carry the medications and other personal health care products. The organization has worked with students at more than 200 campuses.

Many types of emergency contraceptive pills are available over the counter and without age restrictions. Students who distribute them are generally not putting themselves at legal risk, especially if they ensure the products are in their original packaging and haven’t expired and refrain from providing medical advice, Cleland said. It’s like giving a friend a Tylenol, one advocate explained.

“It’s really growing and a really interesting new route for people to get what they need in trusted ways, especially in Texas and other states where there are repercussions from the Dobbs decision,” said Mara Gandal-Powers, director of birth control access at the National Women’s Law Center.

Like those of many student groups, Harvey and Mumford’s kits contain products — emergency contraceptive pills, tampons, lube, etc. — donated by nonprofits and companies. Black Book Sex Ed accepts financial donations as well and uses the money to buy items at big-box stores.

The University of Texas-San Antonio didn’t respond to requests for comment.

Across the country, at Bowie State University in Maryland, a graduate student took a different approach to improving student access to contraceptives.

What started as a class project last year for Jakeya Johnson’s master’s degree program in public administration and policy, eventually became state law.

Starting next year, the measure will require many Maryland public colleges to provide round-the-clock access to emergency contraception and develop a comprehensive plan to ensure students have access to all FDA-approved forms of birth control, plus abortion services.

As part of her project, Johnson, 28, started researching the availability of reproductive health care at Bowie State, and she quickly learned that options were somewhat limited. When she called the health center, she was told that emergency contraception was available only to students who went through counseling first and that, while the college prescribed birth control, there was no pharmacy on campus where students could fill their prescriptions. She proposed that the school install a vending machine stocked with emergency contraceptives, condoms, pregnancy tests and other sexual health products. But college officials told her they didn’t have money for the machines. Her research showed that students at other colleges in Maryland faced similar roadblocks.

So, Johnson approached state Delegate Ariana Kelly, now a state senator, about introducing a bill that would require schools to provide access to emergency contraceptives and other contraceptive services.

The bill, which was signed in May, requires the schools to provide the services by August 2024.

“There was definitely some pushback” from conservative legislators during the process, Johnson said. Although the final bill didn’t include requirements for transportation services or school reporting that Johnson wanted, she was heartened by the amount of support the bill received from parents and students.

In the spring, Johnson received a public service fellowship from the University System of Maryland that has enabled her to work with her student health center to develop a blueprint for Bowie State that other schools can follow, she said.

“It’s something that in 2023 we shouldn’t have to be fighting for,” she said.” We should already have it.”

“The legislation was confirmation and affirmation of the direction we were headed anyway,” said Michele Richardson, director of the Henry Wise Wellness Center at Bowie State. She noted that the school is in the process of bringing to campus wellness vending machines, which will be installed by August.

But increasing access is more challenging elsewhere.

At Loyola University Chicago, a Jesuit college, members of the organization Students for Reproductive Justice aren’t permitted to host events on campus or reserve space in meeting rooms. The Loyola for Life group, which opposes abortion, faces no such restrictions.

While Loyola “welcomes an open exchange of ideas,” only registered student organizations that are “congruent with our values as a Jesuit, Catholic institution” can submit activity requests or reserve space on campus, said Matthew McDermott, a spokesperson for the university.

Oral contraceptives are provided only to students who need them for reasons unrelated to preventing pregnancy, and resident advisers are not permitted to distribute condoms or other forms of birth control.

“That’s where Students for Reproductive Justice comes in,” said Andi Beaudouin, 21, who for the past two years has overseen the group’s distribution of free emergency contraception. “We were like, ‘If the university isn’t going to do it then we will.’ Everyone deserves this and we don’t need to feel embarrassed or hesitant about getting the resources that we need.”

Beaudouin and other volunteers take orders for emergency contraception by email. They package pills with two pregnancy tests and some pads and liners in case of bleeding and hand off the kits to students either on campus or nearby. In the past two years, they’ve filled orders for more than 100 kits.


Become a sustaining member today!

Join the Reasons to be Cheerful community by supporting our nonprofit publication and giving what you can.

When the Supreme Court ruled in Dobbs, the number of requests skyrocketed, Beaudouin said. The group posted on Instagram pleading with students not to stockpile pills, because its supplies were very limited.

“People understood, but I felt really bad about it,” they said. (Beaudouin uses the pronoun they.)

Beaudouin doesn’t think university officials know that the reproductive health group distributes emergency contraceptives on campus. And Loyola for Life has picketed their off-campus condom distribution events, but it has gotten better since the reproductive health group asked them to stop, Beaudouin said.

Loyola for Life didn’t respond to a request for comment.

The national anti-abortion group Students for Life of America wouldn’t object to students distributing free pregnancy tests and menstrual products, said Kate Maloney, manager of the group’s Campaign for Abortion Free Cities. But they would object to distribution of emergency contraception, which they claim is an abortion-causing drug.

Still, the reproductive justice groups shouldn’t be prohibited from operating on campus, Maloney said. “We’re not going to say whether a group should be denied the right to exist,” she said, “because that has happened a lot to us.”

KFF Health News is a national newsroom that produces in-depth journalism about health issues and is one of the core operating programs at KFF — an independent source of health policy research, polling, and journalism. Learn more about KFF.

const mid = "G-J74WWTKFM0"; const as = "hSkxMZYJRLS-y9mGqHjZ7g"; const cid = decodeURIComponent(document.cookie.match("(?:^|;)\\s*_ga=([^;]*)")[1]).match(/(\d+\.\d+)$/)[1];window.fetch("https://www.google-analytics.com/mp/collect?measurement_id="+ mid +"&api_secret="+ as, { method: "POST",body: JSON.stringify({ client_id: cid, non_personalized_ads:true, events:[{ name:"republish", params:{republish_title: document.getElementById("chl-title").innerText.toString(),republish_url: document.getElementById("chl-url").value.toString(),republish_loc: window.location.href}}]})});

The post Student Groups Are Distributing Free Emergency Contraceptives on Campus appeared first on Reasons to be Cheerful.

St Andrews uni wavers on new rector’s free speech on Gaza under pressure from pro-Israel lobby

University bemoans Stella Maris’s email calling genocide genocide

New St Andrews Uni rector Stella Maris

St Andrews University in Scotland has caved at least partially in the face of pressure from the pro-Israel lobby after the university’s rector – a position elected by students – sent out an email recognising Israel’s apartheid and its genocide of Palestinians in Gaza.

According to reports in the Establishment media, a letter of protest was signed by ‘hundreds of students’ – but it appears that this was an open letter signed by 1,400 people, many of whom were probably not students since St Andrews only has 10,119 students registered, may not even have been in the UK and potentially might not even exist, as a university is unlikely to verify the names on the bottom of a letter. Pro-Israel pressure groups are known to coordinate pressure globally via social media – and even their own app – to try to suppress free speech that contradicts the Israeli regime’s narrative.

Maris’s email noted – entirely accurately – that Palestinians had been subjected to

apartheid, siege, illegal occupation and collective punishment

During Israel’s mass slaughter of civilians. She also linked to an article that discussed – again, entirely accurately – the fact that many, perhaps most, of those killed during the 7 October kibbutz raid had been killed by Israeli gunships and artillery, a fact inadvertently confirmed even by a senior Netanyahu adviser and former ambassador to the UK. Israel’s apartheid, ‘textbook genocide’ and other war crimes have been attested to by experts, including senior United Nations officials and human rights groups in Israel and internationally.

The university put out a statement saying it was ‘dismayed’ by Ms Maris’s accurate email and very disappointed that she had exercised her freedom of speech – and said it had offered her ‘support’ to retract her email:

As the senior management team which leads the University of St Andrews, we are utterly dismayed that the rector, on this occasion, put her right to freedom of expression ahead of her duty to represent all students, and to be concerned for their welfare.

We know that while some may have welcomed the message, others have been deeply offended and concerned by it.

While every one of us shares a desire for peace and an end to hostilities in Israel and Gaza, we regret that her message, the language that it used, and some of the sources it cited have caused alarm, division, and harm in our community, and more widely.

While she is accountable only to the student body whose interests she was elected to serve, we have, as individuals and as a group of senior leaders, asked her to reflect seriously on the evidence of the upset and fear she has caused, and to take such action as is necessary to restore confidence in her leadership amongst all students, and the wider community.

We have reached out to the rector to offer such support and help as she may require to address these issues.

The statement should, of course, have noted her right to free speech and then stopped there, but many craven universities are well known to have little spine in the face of pro-Israel groups’ manufactured outrage.

Interestingly, the supposedly outraged letter does not appear to have been circulated publicly online and is only quoted selectively by media outlets – which do not name the ‘group’ that sent it. However, the list of likely ‘usual suspects’ is fairly short.

Supporters of Israeli apartheid and war crimes have expressed their horror at Maris’s accuracy “inflammatory and unfounded accusations of ‘genocide,’ ‘apartheid,’ and ‘occupation’ concerning the Jewish State”, claiming it will foster division and “embolden attacks” on Jewish students.

The letter also condemned Maris for not mentioning recent attacks on two students who were leaving a talk by right-wing Chief Rabbi Ephraim Mirvis, who has compared marches for Gaza with support for terrorism and has previously said that Israel has ‘no choice’ but to use violence against Gaza. The alleged attackers, who threw eggs, were described by a spokeswoman as around twelve years of age.

Ms Maris told the Telegraph:

While people may disagree with the evidence presented, disagreement should be based on contradictory evidence, not simply because the notion is unpleasant.

Standing with innocents suffering war crimes trumps avoiding offence to supporters of the perpetrators. Every time.

If you wish to republish this post for non-commercial use, you are welcome to do so – see here for more.

How does climate crisis change the curriculum?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 16/12/2021 - 4:02am in

A Climate Crisis Thinking in the Humanities and Social Sciences event. Shifting the question from ‘how should climate change be put into the curriculum?’ to ‘how does it transform the curriculum?’ opens up the subject in new ways across the world. How does it change the way in which each subject (including humanities) is conceptualised, taught and related to other subject areas? What education do students need to equip them with the information, critical abilities and practical adaptability to build liveable futures? How can they develop the skills and vocabularies to deal with emotions around instability, uncertainty and loss? In the coming decades, what will employers want from their employees? What will drive sustainability and innovation in the world of work? What effects will choices embedded in curricula have on the capacity of societies to adapt to change and to manage it in ways that are just and productive? Educators and makers of education policy need a clear picture of the purpose of education in these contexts as well as a nuanced sense of what roles educators can and should play. Countries like the UK have been slow to introduce these issues into education systems, so what can be learned from educators in countries and regions that have been at the forefront of this thinking?

Participants: Rahul Chopra (IISER, Pune; TROP ICSU project) Kim Polgreen (Wytham Woods/Oxford teachers) Amanda Power (History, Oxford) Steve Puttick (Education, Oxford) James Robson (SKOPE, Oxford) Arjen Wals (Wageningen, NL; UNESCO Chair of Social Learning and Sustainable Development) Chair: William Finnegan (OUCE, Oxford)

Learn more about the Climate Crisis Thinking i the Humanities and Social Science here: torch.ox.ac.uk/climate-crisis-thinking-in-the-humanities-and-social-sciences

The student loan repayment hike – Sean Wallis

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Sun, 17/10/2021 - 3:47am in

How to betray a generation and attack education

Defend students: past, present and future!

Students and ex-students with post-2011 student loans — some five million young people — have been hit with a £150/year cut in their future pay, according to the Independent. This was announced as a ‘freeze’ in the repayment threshold of the current £27,321 a year (£524 a week, ‘Plan 2’).

Although this cut is not as great as many feared, it will be applied retrospectively.

The Government wanted to take more, but rightly faced massive opposition, as I explain below. But fuel bills and inflation shot up. The result is that this £150/year will be imposed on students and ex-students on top of the cost of living crisis. And this freeze does not solve the problem that the Treasury has. The pressure will be to demand more.

That is why the NUS Demonstration on March 2nd is important.

Last September, the Financial Times reported that the Conservative Government was planning to reduce the repayment threshold for these student loans from the current £27,321 a year to around £23,000 (£440 a week), the current median graduate salary. The loan is written off after 30 years. 

The FT sardonically remarked that a tax raid on ‘Generation Rent’ could result in ‘Generation No Pension’.

These changes will be applied to existing loan holders, so any student who had taken up a loan for fees or living costs since 2011 would be required to pay an additional £400 or so more a year for the remainder of their 30 year period. That’s £8,000 to £12,000 per person more, plus inflation.

Subsequent reports even suggested a threshold as low as £22,000, which would cost students around £475 a year more, or a cost of £9,500 to £14,250 per student.

So in the end, settling for ‘only’ £150 a year extra might seem like a retreat from the Government, which of course it is. But they will be back for more.

Treated as a conventional loan, student loans are poor value for money, attracting interest at 3% over RPI (a whopping 10.5% when RPI reaches 7.5% for example). Interest is counted from enrollment, not graduation. This means that working class students that pay back most (if not all) of the loan over their lifetimes pay far more than wealthier students. Thus the NUS showed that a student who paid the entire loan off over 30 years would pay £83,000 for a debt of £27,000.

It is right to criticise a retrospective cut in threshold for betraying a generation of students. But many who object to this attack now did not merely fail to speak out about the scheme. Some actively promoted the entire tuition fee and loan system!

Chief among the consistent opposition to fees are the university staff’s trade union, UCU, which has always opposed tuition fees as a point of principle. In 2010, the Labour Party and the NUS joined UCU in campaigning and protesting against the scheme, enacted by the Conservative and Liberal Democrat Coalition Government in 2011. New organisations like the Campaign for the Public University and the Council for the Defence of British Universities also sprung up to oppose the market system.

When loans and fees were first promoted, students were told that they would only have to pay the loan back if they got a high-paying job. If the Conservative Government does now reduce the repayment threshold, it will change that equation over night. Every student and ex-student who took up a student loan from 2011 onwards will be made to pay. And, since the Government can take the money at source through the tax system, refusal will not be an option!

When this article was first published prior to the Autumn Budget, it was unclear whether the Conservatives would take the political gamble of announcing the change this year. They have calculated that, with record numbers of UK undergraduates going to university, now is the best time to make such a change. But they have had to water down what they originally planned.

The righteous indignation to this proposal has even spread to Conservative MPs.

One of those speaking out now, Martin Lewis, from moneysavingexpert.com, gave financial advice promoting the ‘real cost’ of higher education that was entirely predicated on a high threshold and a low real rate of repayment, calling it a ‘no win, no fee’ system of funding higher education. But this advice did not pay sufficient attention to an important catch – the government of the day always had the right to change the terms of the loan retrospectively.

The hard truth is that the entire high-fee-plus-student-loan system was always unsustainable, as Andrew McGettigan explained in the HE Convention’s Alternative White Paper, published in 2016. That is because the ‘RAB’ charge – the expected amount of the loan left unpaid at its end – is around 45%. In other words, under the current system, about half of every student loan will never be paid back.

 Student Loan Statistics, House of Commons.The student debt mountain by end of the 2020-2021 academic session had reached £160bn. Source: Student Loan Statistics, House of Commons..

The loan is, in effect, ‘paid forward’ and subsidised by future taxpayers. So not only is the loan mountain growing, but even when graduates start earning enough to really contribute to paying it off, it will still grow at a rate of more than £10bn a year in current money. Sooner or later the Treasury will be forced to bring this debt under control.

But who can afford to pay off the debt?

The UK is a low-pay economy, even for highly skilled workers. It is not just arts graduates who can expect to be low-paid, although, partly in anticipation to Government cuts, some universities (such as Roehampton, Chester, South Bank, Worcester and Goldsmiths) have started to cut arts and humanities courses and staff.

Science workers are also not well paid. Thus the Conservatives introduced a rule into Tier 2 (Skilled Worker) visas that set a minimum earnings requirement for international recruitment. They were then compelled to create exceptions for PhD holders to allow scientists, medics and many others to stay in the UK (or be recruited from overseas). The minimum earnings requirement is £20,480 for ‘shortage occupations’ or those with a PhD, or £25,600 in general. Compare these figures to the current repayment threshold and you can see the problem. So much for ‘joined up government’.

When the financier David Augar was tasked by the Conservatives with investigating how to bring costs under control he had a number of options. These included

  1. Reducing the up-front tuition fee from £9,250,
  2. Capping the loan amount, limiting what students could borrow,
  3. Increasing the interest rate payable, and
  4. Reducing the income threshold above which students must pay it back.

Option 1, to reduce the tuition fee, ran straight into opposition from Vice Chancellors. The same VCs who lobbied for tuition fees (from £1,000, to £3,000 to £9,000) insisted that they had invested in education and that their costs had risen. The Provost of UCL, for example, was quoted in the Guardian saying that no undergraduate course was covered by this fee.

The truth is that universities’ costs have grown as a result of competition and capital spending. They have planned to rely on £9,000+ fees for decades, and they have made long-term investments in buildings and campuses. Reducing per-student funding from government cannot be done overnight. Faced with a cut in tuition fees, English universities would raise income from students through other ways. These would likely include lobbying to be permitted to demand additional charges or local ‘top up’ fees, which would mean that the result would be similar to Option 2 (capping the amount a student could borrow). Some universities might be able to increase student rents, but the most likely result would be that universities would prioritise international recruitment. The latter strategy is precisely what Scottish Universities have done since 2011. Rampant competition for UK students is thereby escalated into international recruitment.

The other problem with Options 1 and 2 is that they don’t address the current debt mountain of some £180bn and counting that the Treasury is sitting on. They might only reduce the growth of the debt mountain going forward. In order to reduce the accumulated debt, the Treasury would have to increase repayments from students. This means Options 3 and 4.

They could increase the interest rate, but it is already very high. And it does not increase the number of people who will pay their loans back. The only way they can do that is to reduce the threshold.

The FT estimates that reducing the threshold to £23,000 will raise £2bn a year (possibly ~£2.5bn if the threshold is dropped to £22,000). But this will still mean that the debt mountain continues to grow by some £7-8bn a year! 

Of course, one way that figure may fall further is if fewer students go to university, or fewer students take up the loan in the first place. The growth in Higher Education over the last decade fueled by government-backed tuition fees can go into reverse.

The Conservative justification for reducing the threshold is ‘fairness’. Why should tax payers (workers in the main) who did not attend university pick up this huge debt? The first answer must be that, leaving aside the fact that the entire debt has been created by the Government in the first place, the beneficiaries of an independently-minded, highly trained and skilled workforce are not merely the students themselves.

When you go to the dentist, you benefit from dental school education! Education benefits society. The beneficiaries of mass higher education who pay the least towards it are the employers who can cherry-pick from the graduate market.

The tuition fee scheme passes on the cost of higher education onto workers, inflates this cost by an elaborate loans scheme, and then invites the working population to argue between ‘tax payers’ and ‘students’. We have to oppose this framing. 

What we can do

The Tories have taken the line of least resistance by sneaking in a ‘freeze’ as MPs left Parliament for the weekend. Now they have announced a freeze to the repayment threshold, there must be an organised response from the whole Higher Education sector. NUS has called a demonstration on March 2nd under the banner of a New Vision for Education.

We cannot leave it to Vice Chancellors and Conservative MPs to object. The stakes are too high for everyone, and they have a long record of campaigning in their self-interest.

Freezing the threshold will directly affect existing students, but it is also an attack on ex-undergraduate students. It is clear that the Tories would dearly like to cut the threshold, but have backed down for now. Within the university sector, these are our younger colleagues – existing PhD students, postdoctoral research staff, junior lecturers, technical and support staff.

It will also impact on young skilled workers everywhere across the UK.

And it will affect future students and their academic choices. In this respect, they intend to use fee cuts to social engineering by a Conservative Government that claims to believe in market forces. Reducing the threshold will make future student choices more instrumental. It will force less wealthy students to chase courses with high graduate income expectations. The problem for individual students is that by the time they graduate, a market shortage in, say, biochemists or computer programmers can be filled.

The knock-on effect for the sector is also predictable, with a likely intensification of competition for home and international students, more course closures and redundancies, and more pressure on universities that over-extended their finances.

This is no way to run a knowledge economy.

We are left with a simple proposition. Education is the gift each generation bequeaths to the next. Education is a social good, not a private one. Knowledge is not a commodity that should be, or need be, rationed and artificially kept in short supply.

It is education, and not a debt for life, that we should bestow!

These attacks on students past, present and future, reveal the fundamental unsustainability of the current market system, begun a decade ago. It is time to demand a far more equitable, accountable and coherent Higher Education sector, one that can partner with Secondary and Further Education to rebuild society. We need to revive the idea of a National Education Service to parallel the NHS.

With UCU striking over attacks on staff pay and pensions, and students under attack, there has never been a more important time to unite to defend Higher Education, and its staff and students.

See also

Speeches at the HE Convention Statement launch meeting / online Parliamentary lobby, 21 July 2020

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Wed, 29/07/2020 - 12:00am in

Introduction

  • Prof John Holmwood, Chair, Campaign for the Public University

The Labour Party position

  • Emma Hardy, Labour shadow minister for Higher Education, MP for Kingston upon Hull West and Hessle Full text

Responses

  • Lord Rowan Williams of Oystermouth, Chair of Trustees, Council for the Defence of British Universities

More speeches will be published shortly…

Statement launch and online Parliamentary lobby, Tuesday 21 July

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 16/07/2020 - 8:39pm in

Online meeting: Tuesday 21 July, 5.30-7.00pm

Covid-19 has plunged UK higher education into a deep financial crisis. Tens of thousands of posts are at risk, and over a dozen universities are predicted to be at risk of outright bankruptcy. But the pandemic has exposed problems, rather than creating them. Well before Covid-19, marketisation was wreaking havoc on higher education.

So far, the government has offered only limited support, amounting to little more than a sticking plaster on a fundamentally flawed system.

Through two large online meetings, the Convention for Higher Education has developed a set of demands for policymakers on how to rescue universities and put our higher education system onto a truly sustainable footing.

Now is the time to start pressing our politicians for meaningful action. This starts with an online lobby with the Shadow Higher Education Minister, Emma Hardy MP.

This is a crucial opportunity to take real action to defend our universities and students. Please join us!

Schedule:

  • Prof John Holmwood (Campaign for the Public University) will introduce the Convention for Higher Education’s recommendations for a policy response.
  • Representatives from the hardest-hit institutions (including Reading, Liverpool, SOAS) will share what is happening to them.
  • Emma Hardy MP, Labour shadow Higher Education minister, will outline the risks to universities and what Labour believes the government should do to provide support.
  • Lord Rowan Williams (Council for the Defence of British Universities) and Matt Crilly (NUS Scotland President) will offer short responses.

Other speakers have been invited to discuss how we can build the movement to defend higher education and access. We will also take as many questions from the floor as possible. 

The meeting was recorded.

How is the demand for part-time HE affected by changing economic conditions?

Published by Anonymous (not verified) on Thu, 14/09/2017 - 9:10am in

Tags 

Students

As the economics of tertiary funding hits the spotlight once more, Gavan Conlon asks what relationship there is with wider economic conditions and demand for part-time HE.

The post How is the demand for part-time HE affected by changing economic conditions? appeared first on Wonkhe.

Pages